Communication Convergence 2015

Building on last year’s inaugural event, Cheryl Stephens and Kate Harrison Whiteside put together a full day of sessions at Communication Convergence 2015, most of them looking at the ways technology has affected writing, publishing, and other means of communication. Fawn Mulcahy—How has technology changed how we communicate? Fawn Mulcahy has more than twenty years … Continue reading “Communication Convergence 2015”

Overview of publication project management (Beyond the Red Pencil, 2015)

Melissa Duffes, editorial director of Marquand Books and previously head of publications and media for the Allen Memorial Art Museum at Oberlin College, moderated a panel discussion including three of her fellow project managers: Mary Jane Anderson, publications coordinator at the Center on Reinventing Public Education, a research and policy centre at the University of … Continue reading “Overview of publication project management (Beyond the Red Pencil, 2015)”

Self-publishing and the oft-neglected index

For some of my editorial colleagues, working with self-publishers is their bread and butter. Many of these editors become de facto project managers, capably shepherding each book through its editorial and production phases—and sometimes even helping with sales and marketing campaigns. Yet, they often forget about the index, even though it can help an author’s work … Continue reading “Self-publishing and the oft-neglected index”

PubPro 2014 recaps

The second annual PubPro unconference for managing editors and publication production professionals took place on Saturday, May 24. We had ten fantastic sessions in a day packed with peer-to-peer learning and networking. Volunteers Megan Brand, Lara Kordic, and Lana Okerlund took notes, and their summaries of the sessions have been appearing weekly throughout the summer … Continue reading “PubPro 2014 recaps”

Take a walk on the wild side—nonbreaking space edition

Why nonbreaking spaces? Line breaks like Mr. Lee or World War II hinder readability because readers have to scan to the next line before they receive the information that completes the concept they’re reading about. In these cases, we want to keep the words together, and the best method is to use a nonbreaking space. … Continue reading “Take a walk on the wild side—nonbreaking space edition”

House style and the zombie apocalypse: How a poorly thought-out style guide can cost you

Professional freelance editors will be familiar with a few industry-standard style manuals: Chicago Manual of Style Canadian Press Stylebook Associated Press Stylebook MLA Style Manual APA Publication Manual These references offer broad coverage of most style issues; they’ve been honed over several editions and generally serve editors well. Yet, the vast majority of organizations that … Continue reading “House style and the zombie apocalypse: How a poorly thought-out style guide can cost you”

Book review: The Employer’s Guide to Hiring Freelancers and Managing Outsourced Projects

Jim Coutu is an arbitrator who works with freelance job sites; essentially he’s a judge in what he calls “project divorce court.” When a project goes sour, it’s his job to pore over correspondence between the client and freelancer, interpreting often vague contracts to figure out who ultimately gets the money. In other words, he’s … Continue reading “Book review: The Employer’s Guide to Hiring Freelancers and Managing Outsourced Projects

PubPro 2014—Registration opens soon!

Registration opens this Friday for the second annual PubPro unconference for managing editors and publication production specialists, co-hosted by the Editors’ Association of Canada’s BC branch and SFU Publishing Workshops. This year, the event will take place on Saturday, May 24, beginning in room 1420 at Harbour Centre, and, like last year, it will consist … Continue reading “PubPro 2014—Registration opens soon!”

Comments on Canada’s science and technology trajectory

I just sent this note in response to Industry Canada’s consultation paper, Seizing Canada’s Moment, and I encourage anyone who has an opinion about Canada’s science and technology strategy to write in as well. You can send your feedback to science-tech-innovation-consultation@ic.gc.ca by February 7, 2014. I’m not naive enough to believe that anyone at Industry … Continue reading “Comments on Canada’s science and technology trajectory”

Why open access proponents should care about plain language

Virtually all academic research in Canada receives support from one of three federal funding agencies—the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), or Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)—and researchers in other countries similarly depend to some extent on federal funding, whether from the National Institutes of Health … Continue reading “Why open access proponents should care about plain language”